Get More CYS Delivered Straight to Your Inbox
 

8th Annual Sacred Mayan Journey

50 oarsmen on board 35 canoes will cross from Xcaret to Cozumel – a 17 mile trek each way – to worship the goddess of fertility, Ixchel.

The 8th annual Sacred Mayan Journey that will take place in Cancun on May 22 – 24.  As the fourth most popular summer destination in the world for 2014 – according to the American Society of Travel Agents (ASTA) – Cancun is thrilled to welcome visitors to witness this Mayan spectacle. Every year, more and more tourists wake up at the crack of dawn to send off these oarsmen and to experience Xcaret’s pre-Hispanic market for a dose of all things Maya.

Replica Canoes Used In Ancient Navigation

350 oarsmen on board 35 canoes will cross from Xcaret to Cozumel – a 17 mile trek each way – to worship the goddess of fertility, Ixchel. The Sacred Mayan Journey is a pre-Hispanic ritual from the Late Post Classic Period (1250-1519 A.D.) which, after more than 500 years since the last crossing, was recovered as a practice that strengthens the cultural identity of Cancun and has a positive impact in the preservation of the historical legacy of the Maya.

Tourists who visit Cancun during this time will not only be there to cheer the rowers on as they depart, but will also be able to visit a Mayan pre-Hispanic interactive market and be fully immersed in Mayan lore and culture. This market blends the colors, aromas and flavors of the Maya into one place and offers visitors a chance to live the way the Mayans did, even if only for a few hours. Guests will exchange their dollars for cocoa beans – the ancient Mayan form of currency – and be able to purchase handicrafts and other homemade goods from the Mayan people that live in the surrounding area. Articles like homemade jewelry, food, clothing and other local items can be purchased.

Teams Participating in the Sacred Mayan Race

This ancient journey transports guests back to the Mayan civilization of the 11th and 16th centuries and showcases the courage of ancient seamen, whose trade routes contributed to the Mayan civilization’s glorious final days in the Yucatan Peninsula.